Are Scratched Vinyl Records Worth Anything?

Vinyl just like CD’s get scratched and it could be because of a number of reasons. Most of these reasons are based on the handling of the vinyl itself.

It pays to be very mindful whilst handling vinyl because you could easily scratch them if you handle them with less care than they need.

In this post I’m going to explain to you whether scratched vinyl is actually worth anything because this is something that most people have questions about.

With that said, let’s get right into this post.

Are scratched vinyl records worth anything?

It depends on the condition of the scratches and the record itself. If you have a mildly scratched vinyl of a vintage classic that is sought after, you could get a fair deal on it.

However, if the record is over-scratched, and its apparent that these scratches will cause problems when playing, the vinyl record may be worth very little.

Factors to consider

It’s important to consider the following.

What kind of record you have

Determine what kind of record you have and figure out if it’s in demand or not.

A vinyl record that is in high demand can be sold for a fair amount granted its not overly scratched.

The state of the record

The scratches that are on the record have a huge impact on what deal you basically end up making for them.

If they’re overly scratched, you’ll find it difficult to sell them.

If they’re not over scratched, you could negotiate a fair deal with the intended buyer.

The buyer in question

The buyer is another consideration.

Is the buyer a collector?

Is the buyer a reseller?

Answering these questions is important because if your buyer is buying with the motive to resell, they’ll only pay for a vinyl record that they can resell.

Value

The value of the vinyl in your hands is another consideration.

If your vinyl is high value and fairly scratched, you could sell it for a reasonable price.

If its overly scratched, you may face problems in finding anyone willing to pay for it.

Where to Store Your Vinyl Records

Location

Storage location is everything.

The location you choose to keep your record collection in, is essential in maintaining the health of your albums.

Many people choose to stash their old vinyl in an attic, but this is not always the best of choices.

There are a few elements that you need to consider when contemplating storage options for your vinyl. Let’s discuss some of these.

Temperature

The first and most important aspect to consider is the room temperature of your storage area.

You want to store vinyl records in a cool place that isn’t too cold or too hot.

If you expose vinyl to high heat for extended periods of time, it can lead to warping and other negative effects that can be damaging.

An ideal out-of-main-home storage area would be a temperature-controlled attic or a storage unit.

However, most attics can get a lot hotter than the rest of the house. So you need to tread lightly.

Also, cellars can be a great choice if you can control the moisture level. 

Humidity

The second most important thing to consider when it comes to storing your vinyl is the humidity level.

High humidity or moisture in the air can cause damage to your albums over time.

Professional bodies like the Northeast Document Conservation Center recommend that you store your vinyl recorde at a temperature of around 50-60 degrees Fahrenheit and a humidity level of 30-40 percent.

In a normal house, a finished basement can be ideal for this, as it will remain cooler without getting as humid as a cellar might.

If this option isn’t on the table, you could try to find a room in your house that can remain cool and can have low humidity.

Light

Most people choose to ignore this part. but lighting conditions are especially important.

Constant exposure to bright lights and direct sunlight can damage your vinyl when it’s exposed to these conditions over time.

Light isn’t necessarily an issue in most cases, but if you have a large window next to your records or you have a plant-growing setup with UV lights, be careful not to store your vinyl in view of the light.